What happened to the anti-war movement?

A couple of things have led me to writing this post.  Firstly, I spent an evening with some soldiers on the Friday night before the kids arrived at Rothiemurchus Lodge, and secondly I watched "why we fight" last night.

My evening with the army guys reminded me that the men and women out in Afghanistan and Iraq getting shot at and blown up on a daily basis in our names are just regular folk.  They are not imperialist fiends.  They are regular folks, many of them from relatively deprived backgrounds, who saw the army as a way of making a decent living.  They are being killed and maimed in Afghanistan and Iraq, but we don't really seem to care.

I marched before the war began, and I wrote to my MP to complain, but once the bombs started falling on Baghdad I went pretty quiet.  And I have remained so.

I read Robert Fisk before the assault on Iraq started, and trusted his judgement that winning the war would be easy but that the real problems would then begin, and be protracted and bloody.  And when this came to pass, I felt a bit smug.  But I didn't go back out on the streets to bring our troops home.  I didn't call for direct action.  I just went back to my cosy life and shook my head at the news.

I am clearly not alone.  Millions of us marched in London, Glasgow and elsewhere prior to the invasion.  No subsequent marches have come anywhere near those numbers.

We should be ashamed of ourselves.

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